Inflammation

$59.00

Receive detailed biomarker analysis reports analyzing 20 key protein biomarkers involved in inflammation. Track the levels over time.

SKU: PANOIN Category:

Description

Use 20 protein biomarkers to monitor patterns of inflammation which can ensure the positive benefits repair of muscle damage, development of stronger muscle fibers, and resistance to future muscle damage are realized and that the occurrence and negative effects of chronic inflammation are reduced.

Track Inflammation: When you exercise, your body initiates the process of inflammation; attracting immune cells to the site of injury and promoting tissue repair. After exercise, a short-term inflammatory response is followed by a long-term anti-inflammatory response. This promotes repair of muscle damage, development of stronger muscle fibers, and resistance to future muscle damage. However, a pattern of chronic inflammation can be a warning – and an indication that muscle repair isn’t occurring properly which can result in decreased performance and increased risk of injury. Protein biomarker monitoring can help identify this pattern and monitor any corrective measures implemented to reduce the occurrence and negative effects of chronic inflammation.

20 Biomarkers Measured:

  1. COMP (Thrombospondin-5)
    Increased levels in response to acute exercise
    Reference
  2. CRP (C-Reactive Protein)
    Increased levels in response to acute exercise; decrease in baseline levels with long-term training (>6 wks)
    Reference 1 | Reference 2
  3. D-Dimer
    Increased levels in response to prolonged strenuous exercise
    Reference 1 | Reference 2
  4. E-Selectin
    Increased levels in response to prolonged strenuous exercise
    Reference
  5. Growth Hormone
    Increased levels in response to acute exercise
    Reference
  6. ICAM-1 (CD54)
    Increased levels in response to prolonged strenuous exercise
    Reference
  7. IFN-gamma
    Unchanged levels in response to acute exercise; increased levels in response to regular moderate exercise
    Reference 1 | Reference 2
  8. IL-1 Ra (IL-1 F3)
    Increased levels in response to acute exercise
    Reference 1 | Reference 2
  9. IL-10
    Increased levels in response to acute exercise
    Reference 1 | Reference 2
  10. IL-12 p70
    Increased levels in response to acute exercise
    Reference 1 | Reference 2
  11. IL-17A
    Moderately increased levels in response to acute exercise
    Reference 1 | Reference 2
  12. IL-18
    Decreased levels in response to acute exercise; decreased levels in response to regular exercise
    Reference 1 | Reference 2
  13. IL-1 alpha (IL-1 F1)
    Acutely Increased levels in response to exercise
    Reference 1 | Reference 2
  14. IL-1 beta (IL-1 F2)
    Increased levels in response to acute exercise
    Reference 1 | Reference 2
  15. IL-2
    Decreased levels in response to endurance exercise
    Reference
  16. IL-4
    Increased levels in response to moderate acute exercise; decreased levels in response to intense exercise
    Reference 1 | Reference 2
  17. IL-6
    Increased levels in response to acute exercise
    Reference 1 | Reference 2 | Reference 3
  18. TNF RII (TNFRSF1B)
    Increased levels in response to acute exercise
    Reference 1 | Reference 2
  19. TNF alpha
    Increased levels in response to acute exercise
    Reference
  20. MCP-1 (CCL2)
    Increased levels in response to acute exercise
    Reference 1 | Reference 2
PanoHealth | Inflammation